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Made in the USA and Proud of it-Lucky's Hunting Blinds-Tom Lounsbury

Tom Lounsbury

Sun, 05 Jan 2014 16:12:31 EST

 


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Made in the USA and Proud of it - Lucky’s Hunting Blinds
                   By Tom Lounsbury

Time certainly can pass you by. It doesn’t seem like all of 23 years ago that I first met Bob Peruski of Ubly, when he contacted me and gave an invitation to come around and check out a very portable ground blind he had just invented.
To start, I wasn’t much into any sort of hunting blinds at the time, especially when it came to deer hunting, being a totally solo still-hunting, tracking, spot and stalk, deer-calling and stump-sitting woods roamer that believed in full mobility and diversified hunting tactics. This was of course before my three sons were old enough to hunt and I was a bit of an independent and loner sort.
Curiosity however got the best of me and I soon found myself meeting up with Bob Peruski in the back of a garage where he worked on cars. The first thing I noticed was Bob’s hands when we met. They were calloused with a bruised/blackened fingernail here and there, and he was clearly a direct and hands-on working man, something I respected right at the get go. He looks you right in the eye and doesn’t hold back on telling you what he thinks. He is also very open to your opinion, and above all, wants an honest response in return. I have no problem with that attitude at all.
The next thing Bob did after I met him was reach over to a long and narrow clump of camouflage material leaning on the wall, slapped it down in front of me, and with a flick of his wrists---presto! There before me was a dome-shaped, tent-type hunting blind with shooting windows, an act not much different than a magician pulling a rabbit out of the hat. Without a doubt, I saw the very early beginnings of the Lucky’s Hunting Blinds hitting the market right then and there. To say I was impressed was an understatement, and besides being obviously creative, Bob is also an astute salesman and he could instinctively tell I wasn’t leaving there without a very portable Lucky’s Hunting Ground Blind. I clearly had to have one.
I put that blind to use right away and a whole new avenue of (still mobile) hunting opened up to me, and the wind didn’t tear me up nor did I have the rain and snow drench and chill me during hunts in rigorous weather. It didn’t take me long at all to adapt to using a highly portable, enclosed blind and soon after, my young sons were hunting with me as well, and it was a no-brainer taking a kid out hunting in that sort of controlled environment found in a concealing, weather protective hunting blind. I have no doubt all of my sons’ earliest memories of deer and wild turkey hunting entail being in a Lucky’s Hunting Blind (not to mention varmint, crow and squirrel hunting experiences as well).
One fact I discovered through long use about Lucky’s Hunting Blinds is the high quality of construction and materials. Bob Peruski has created a cottage Industry where local folks sew up the blind materials (in a wide variety of camouflage patterns in tough 600 Denier) in their homes, and the metal structures are made in the Lucky’s facility just outside of Ubly by Bob and his son Bob Jr. It is a system that works and can clearly be called “Made in the USA”, something both Bob and his son are very proud of.
A prime example of the enduring quality of a Lucky’s Hunting Blind is the one (a “Little Texas” ground blind) I left set up in an ideal location in the woods, for 12 years straight without ever moving it, and it never failed (including the door zipper) and remained weather tight. It also provided a lot of fine hunting opportunities and memories for my family and me (I called in and tagged one of my largest bucks from this blind).
Bob Peruski has developed several variations of his hunting blind not only for on the ground use but for tree stand and raised platform applications as well, and he seems to come up with some new creation on a regular basis. Needless to say I was real curious when he let me know recently he had developed a new ground blind he wanted me to check out, and of course give him my honest opinion of it.
Upon checking out Lucky’s new “Swivel Chair Ground Blind” I was, as usual, very impressed. As its name implies, the highly portable blind which includes a comfortable seat, can rotate fully around offering a decent shooting window always directly in front of the hunter. It actually reminded me of the action and function of a turret on a tank. Camo netting on the convenient side windows allows complete concealment and full visibility. Designed for a solo hunter, its dimensions cause it to quite literally look like a stump in the woods. The assembly of the blind in the field is quick and as easy as flicking your wrists and attaching it to the swivel chair system.
In typical enclosed blinds, hunters must wait for the intended game animal to step into line with a fixed position window for an accurate shot. The Swivel Chair Blind allows the hunter to easily (and carefully when dealing with wary game animals) move the window to the quarry for a shot at any angle. It offers plenty of draw room for using a bow and arrow and the gun/crossbow version has a stabile shooting rest. Needless to say I had to have a Lucky’s Swivel Chair Blind and can see it will be a jewel in the field for hunting deer, turkeys, crows, predators and even waterfowl (my Swivel Chair Blind will soon see use during the early goose season). It is clearly both highly versatile and portable in a compact package.
Lucky’s Hunting Blinds come in a wide array of styles, sizes and camouflage designs, and they also do custom work. According to Bob Peruski Jr. if it is feasible and reasonable, Lucky’s will make it.
For more information go to www.luckyshuntingblinds.com or call 989-658-8686, or check out facebook.com/pages/lucky-hunting-blinds.


Bob Peruski demonstrating how the his new Swivel Chair Blind operates
while offering a stabile shooting rest for a crossbow or firearm.


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